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John R.
John R.
User

How do I upgrade X5(V13) from Windows 7 to Win 10?"  en

Author: John R.
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Hi, I'm updating my computer from Windows 7 to Window 10. My Incomedia X5 version is 13. Could someone give me a step-by-step guide on what to do. My developer in no longer at hand and I need to migrate one website (www.limerickandtipperarywoodlandowners.ie) and only have a basic understanding of this program. 

Also, will I need to buy a new license or will the program be reinstalled automatically?

Will I need to backup the website to an external hard drive and import it on the new system? Will the website need any work or can I pick it up as I left in on Win 7?

Thanks in advance for the assistance

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7 ANSWERS - 1 USEFUL
Donald M.
Donald M.
User

As long as you are performing an upgrade to Win10 and not a fresh installation, everything should just work as it did before. The free upgrade, which Microsoft claimed would be withdrawn a year after Win10 came out, is actually still available (from Microsoft itself - it's not difficult to find if you search).

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Posted on the from Donald M.
Donald M.
Donald M.
User

Should have said, the upgrade does require your copy of Win7 to be properly licensed, but that's all.

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Posted on the from Donald M.
Esahc ..
Esahc ..
Moderator

John, before proceeding with any changes to your PC go to step 5 and export to create an iwzip of every project. Copy these iwzip files to somewhere safe (eg external HD).

The iwzip is a full backup of your project. 

If you are at all worried, you can open wx5 and select import to guarantee you have a good backup (this will NOT overwrite your existing project). This should be tested because earlier versions of WX5 sometimes glitched on large projects.

When Win 10 is installed, if you need to reinstall wx5 you can get it from here. Go to your profile (top right) and select download to fetch the installer, you will also require your license from the same drop down. 

When I had to upgrade WIN I took the pre-emptive step of taking an image of my existing hd. There are many such programs and some are free (eg EASUS). After the upgrade this let me retrieve files somehow lost or overlooked during the process.

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Posted on the from Esahc ..
John R.
John R.
User
Author

Many thanks for replies.

I was indeed thinking of making a clone of the win 7 hard drive  before upgrading to 10, just in case. And yes, the W7 license is good. So in theory, all going well, there shouldnt be an issue abour X5 licensing since its an upgrade, not a fresh install.

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Posted on the from John R.
Esahc ..
Esahc ..
Moderator

Good luck with the upgrade John. For the record I have subsequently done half a dozen upgrades (for customers). All bar one worked as a clean install on an empty HD (new SSD) and activated when I put in the Windows 7 Activation Key.

The advantage was a clean install with no dross left over from years of installed, uninstalled and forgotten software, updates and hidden registry entries.

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Posted on the from Esahc ..
Kathy C.
Kathy C.
User

When I upgraded from Windows 7 (home edition) last year, the Windows 10 (Home) upgrade meant that I had to uninstall Windows 7 first. This was rather scary!

If this is still the case with the Windows 10 upgrade, do make sure you back up everything on your computer and not just your Website X5 files.

As many people know - I am no techie but to my surprise, everything worked perfectly and smoothly. So if I can do it ...:)  good luck.

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Posted on the from Kathy C.
Donald M.
Donald M.
User

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10

As  I said, this is an upgrade which keeps all your files and programmes. I've done it more than a dozen times.

During the procedure you will be warned if there are going to be any issues normally rlating to outdated hardware drivers, but thes are rare. The only thing I had to do regularly post -upgrade was reset the default printer to being the default once again- a single click!

Here below is an excerpt from an online magazine article which explains why Microsoft still make the free upgrade available........

Although Microsoft officially ended its free upgrade offer in mid-2016, one year after the initial release of Windows 10, it continues to make the upgrade free (and painless) for its retail customers running Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.  Why is Microsoft doing this? And is there a catch?  The answer to that first question is easy. Remember, Microsoft's Windows business is predicated on its partnership with PC makers (OEMs), who pay a license fee for every copy of Windows they install on a new PC. Those OEMs are none too happy about the idea of extending the life of an older PC; they would much rather have you buy a brand new PC instead.  So, to mollify its OEM partners, Microsoft put a time limit on the free upgrade offer, and they simply don't speak of it now. The Windows marketing team continues to promote new models of Windows PCs, and the enterprise sales staff continues to sell volume licenses of Windows 10 Enterprise and Microsoft 365 subscriptions. Nobody talks about upgrades.  Frankly, at this point the only people who are still interested in a free upgrade are enthusiasts, home users, and very small businesses running hardware that's at least four years old. Several of the reports I received specifically mention successfully upgrading PCs from the very beginning of the Windows 7 era in 2009-2011.  The vast majority of Windows PCs sold in the past four years included Windows 10 licenses, and businesses who have stuck with Windows 7 have typically done so by exercising downgrade rights. They're free to install Windows 10 anytime, without having to jump through any hoops.  On PC's that were originally sold with older versions of Windows, Microsoft's calculus is pretty straightforward: It's in the company's best interests to see those old Windows versions retired, both for support purposes and to improve the security of the Windows ecosystem. There's no profit in trying to sell upgrades to that market, and there's plenty of goodwill to reap by making those upgrades easy.  BUT IS THERE A CATCH?  The second question is a little tougher. Is there a catch? In technical terms, no. A PC that is upgraded from Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 in 2019 reports that it is activated and has a digital license for Windows 10.  Is that license legal? As I've said many times, I am not a lawyer, so I can't offer legal advice. But I have a lot of experience with Windows licensing, and it's literally inconceivable (and yes, that word means exactly what you think it means) that Microsoft would choose to enforce an ambiguous license agreement against its retail customers. They are, after all, prospects to subscribe to Office 365, buy Xbox hardware and games, play Minecraft, and eventually buy a new Windows 10 PC from one of those aforementioned partners.
And whatever pittance Microsoft's bean counters might be able to squeeze out of those upgrades wouldn't come close to balancing the very, very bad publicity that would come from sending threatening letters to retirees and mom-and-pop businesses that are trying to squeeze a few extra years of life out of their old hardware.  If you're running a business, of course, the calculation is different. Do you really want to be unsure about whether your business software assets are properly licensed? (Your accountant will tell you no.) But here too I'm convinced that there's roughly zero likelihood that the software police are going to haul anyone away because they decided to upgrade an old PC.  Ultimately, this all ties into the new Windows retail licensing model Microsoft introduced with Windows 10 in 2015. You only have to buy the license once, usually with a new PC, and after that all the upgrades are free, as long as the hardware allows it. That's the official policy with Windows 10, and it's clear that the unofficial policy includes older Windows versions too.  

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Posted on the from Donald M.